Creatine – The King of Bodybuilding Supplements

 

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creatine

Overview

Creatine is naturally occurring substance that is found in many foods, particularly in red meat. Creatine is often thought of as a bodybuilding supplement, however it is an important nutrient for humans and all vertebrates alike and is essential for energy production for every single cell in the body. When supplemented, it can provide further benefits that would be hard to attain from diet alone. It is particularly useful for vegans and vegetarians as it can be next to impossible to acquire from non-meat sources.

Creatine is no joke, there is perhaps no supplement in history which has been studied more thoroughly than creatine. This is for a simple reason: it works. This is not a placebo supplement that doesn’t actually do anything – it has real effects and real benefits. It also is extremely inexpensive and has almost no side effects except for GI distress (which only happens if you don’t drink enough water).

Creatine is more than a mere workout supplement; it is essential maintaining mental health and physical energy levels. It can be a great tool for fixing lethargy, brain fog, mood problems, and poor concentration. There is even a range of conditions called cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes (CCDS) which results in mental retardation1www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK3794/, and this may further drive home the point that this is not a mere bodybuilding supplement but a necessary nootropic nutrient for the body.

The main benefit of creatine is that it will grant you with more energy. Creatine is provides adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the cells, the primary energy “currency” of the cells. ATP is used in every metabolic process in the body, and will raise energy levels in both the body and brain. Since ATP is used by every cell in the body for energy, increasing it can directly improve energy levels of every muscle and organ of the body, including the brain.

Creatine has overwhelming evidence that demonstrates its ability to increase power and improve physical performance in both exercise and athletic contexts.2www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/176856913www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/159942584www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/186081035www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/116770056www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/185452047www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14636102 8www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/129458309www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1794330810www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2120705411www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1514202912www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17685723

In terms of exercise performance, it appears to improve anaerobic exercise in particular.13www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1938738614www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1970637415www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14971965 Creatine is also remarkable reducing both mental and physical fatigue.16www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1608319317www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1257893718www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1198588019www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1805300220www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16416332

For people with creatine deficiencies, supplementation can improve mood and wellbeing quite substantially and is key for maintaining mental health.21www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1798836622www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2183144823www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22864465

 

Where to Purchase Creatine

creatine

Buy Creatine Monohydrate Powder at Nootropics Depot [Vendor Info]

 

Creatine Dosage Information

The best form of to take is creatine monohydrate, which is both the cheapest and most effective form. For general purposes, it is recommended to take 5g a day with meals. It is also advised drink plenty of water (2-3 full glasses) to avoid any potential GI discomfort. It is not a good idea to take it with coffee or alcohol either as you may get diarrhea. Take it with breakfast in the morning and drink plenty of water and you’ll be fine. You can take higher doses of 10-20g for the first week to get it saturated in your system, but t­his does pose the risk of some mild GI discomfort.

 

References

  1. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK3794/
  2. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17685691
  3. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15994258
  4. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18608103
  5. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11677005
  6. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18545204
  7. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14636102
  8. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12945830
  9. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17943308
  10. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21207054
  11. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15142029
  12. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17685723
  13. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19387386
  14. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19706374
  15. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14971965
  16. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16083193
  17. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12578937
  18. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11985880
  19. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18053002
  20. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16416332
  21. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17988366
  22. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21831448
  23. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22864465

 

 

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